• 2019 WINNER OF BEST MUSIC VENUE & BEST EVENT SPACE IN WESTCHESTER MAGAZINE

  • 149 WESTCHESTER AVENUE, PORT CHESTER, NY 10573-4549 · (914) 937-4126

  • April 21st, 2014

    reCAP :: Amos Lee w/ Mutlu :: 2014.04.19

    Written By: Meredith Burke
    Photos by: Scott Harris

    Amos Lee and his band came to The Capitol Theatre on Saturday night to an appreciative crowd of all ages. Lee wooed the audience with his sweet tenor voice for a two hour intimate performance that featured acoustic and electric elements.

    Amos Lee was a second grade teacher in Philadelphia, before his manager in 2003 sent a demo CD to Blue Note Records. Before long Norah Jones heard his signature vocals and asked him to be the opener for her 2004 tour. Five albums and nine years later, he is touring with an accomplished band behind him and performing a mix of bluegrass, country, funk and soul. His voice is intoxicating. His sound is fresh.
    And the vibe is full of love and levity.

    The set list at The Cap is comparable to the other shows he’s played on this tour, including covers like Queen’s “Fat Bottomed Girls” and Beyonce’s “Single Ladies.” He thrilled the crowd with a beautifully haunting “Violin,” a song not often played, and spanned his entire repertoire of albums, including songs like “Windows Are Rolled Down,” “Night Train,” and his 2011 “Supply and Demand.”

    The energy passed back and forth from Lee and his band to the audience is striking. Lee is not afraid to let others take center stage. Opening act, singer songwriter Mutlu, came out to do a ridiculous soul ballad entitled “Caramelize Me,” which had the crowd in stitches.
    There were lots of hoots and hollers as Amos Lee’s smooth delivery had a pretty heady effect. A woman in the crowd couldn’t help herself from shouting, and burst out during “Night Train,” as the whole theater, including Lee started laughing. He asked us to “keep it quiet,” during “Arms of Woman,” when he came off the microphone to center stage.

    Throughout the performance he made us feel as if we were part of his show. He has an innate ability to connect to an audience, making his story our own. We all hope Amos Lee and his band comes back around sooner than later.

     

    The Capitol Theatre Photo Gallery

    Photos by: Scott Harris