Galactic Winter Tour and Robert Randolph & The Family Band

SiriusXM Jam On Presents:

Galactic Winter Tour and Robert Randolph & The Family Band

with special guests Con Brio

Sat, March 11, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

The Capitol Theatre

Port Chester, NY

$30 // $45 (ADVANCE) $35 // $50 (DAY OF SHOW)

This event is 18 and over

This event will have a general admission standing room only floor and a reserved seated Loge and Balcony. Reserved Loge and Balcony tickets will NOT have access to the general admission floor.

Galactic
Galactic
It’s been more than 20 years since Ben Ellman, Robert Mercurio, Stanton Moore, Jeff Raines and Rich Vogel began exploring the seemingly limitless musical possibilities born out of their work together as Galactic. Since then, the seminal New Orleans band has consistently pushed artistic boundaries on the road and in the studio, approaching their music with open ears and drawing inspiration as much from the sounds bubbling up from their city’s streets as they do from each other.

A key part of that creative spark comes from the teamwork of Mercurio and Ellman, whose ever-evolving production and arranging skills helped usher the band into a new phase of studio work beginning with the loop-centric “Ruckus” in 2007. A series of albums focused around specific concepts like Carnival followed, as did collaborations with guests hailing from worlds outside the one Galactic calls its own.

On “Into the Deep,” the band members look within themselves instead, drawing inspiration from people and ideas that have long been close to their hearts – and, in turn, close to the development of their unique sound. Shot through with soul, funk, blues and rock, the result is an organic riff on elements of Galactic’s past, filtered through the lens of where they’re headed in 2015.

“I see this album as a kind of culmination of all of our collaborations or experiences, from [trombonist] Corey Henry to the people we met on the road, touring,” says Mercurio, referencing Ellman’s first full-time gig in New Orleans, which kicked off when Henry hired him into the Little Rascals Brass Band in 1989.

“The previous albums took us in the opposite direction,” Mercurio says. “We collaborated with rappers that we had never dealt with and even on the New Orleans tracks, we didn’t have working experience with most of those artists before the recordings.”

In contrast, “Into the Deep” contributors like JJ Grey, David Shaw and Maggie Koerner spent significant time touring with Galactic. A few years ago, Mavis Staples sat in with the band, all of whom are longtime fans of the legendary singer’s R&B-meets-gospel soul style. They caught up with Macy Gray when she performed a memorable concert at Tipitina’s where Ellman says he could see from the outset “how much she cares about the music.” And each of the players had also developed a deep appreciation for the Honorable South’s Charm Taylor, whose contribution, “Right On” was written specifically to suit her vibe.

“Quint Davis [the producer of] Jazz Fest always has a couple people he books at the festival that aren’t big names but that Quint knows are going to be super cool,” says Ellman. “That’s how we met Brushy One-String. We originally wanted to bring him in to do anything, just to see what would happen. But when we heard his song ‘Chicken in the Corn,’ we really wanted to do our version of it.”

In the end, he joined them on the road for over a month, collaborating with the band onstage at each show.

For the instrumental tracks, Galactic mined the interests and tastes they’ve cultivated together for years in New Orleans. “Buck 77” was written via improvisation, a long-standing cornerstone of their live shows. The funky bass line and tumbling guitar part on “Long Live the Borgne,” meanwhile, represents an updated, more composed take on some of the concepts that made early albums like “Coolin’ Off” so strong.

As for the opener “Soogar Doosie,” Ellman points out Galactic tends to record at least one track on each album that speaks to the band’s collective love of brass band music.

“We write [those songs] with the idea of how awesome it would be to hear the Rebirth going down doing the street in a second line playing one of our songs. We try to think of a real second line song that would get people slapping stop signs and dancing on cars,” he says.

The album, Ellman says “is all about people. It’s these connections we’ve made over 20 years. They’re people in our orbit that have come into our little world and affected us in some way.”

It’s also about how the individual musicians within Galactic have grown over time. When it comes to trying new approaches as players, producers, songwriters and arrangers, Ellman muses, “it’s an evolution
Robert Randolph & The Family Band
Robert Randolph & The Family Band
When Robert Randolph talks about his new album, Lickety Split, a few words come up over and over—”joy,” “freedom,” “energy.” Which is no surprise, really, because those are the same things that immediately spring into a listener’s mind when these twelve tracks from the virtuoso pedal steel guitarist and his longtime accompanists, the Family Band, explode out of the speakers.
“My thing is really upbeat, uptempo, with great guitar riffs,” says Randolph, summarizing his musical ambitions, “but also catchy choruses and lyrics that someday will make this music into classic tunes.”


“Robert Randolph is an American Original,” says Don Was, President of Randolph’s new label, Blue Note Records. “He has mastered what is, arguably, the most complex instrument in the world and developed a unique voice that is equal parts street-corner church and Bonnaroo. This album finally captures the energy and excitement of his legendary live performances.”
But for Randolph, the road to Lickety Split—his first studio recording in three years—wasn’t an easy path. Though his distinctive mix of rock, funk, and rhythm & blues continued to earn a rapturous response from a fervent, international audience, he felt that he had lost some of the enthusiasm and intensity that had driven him to make music in the first place.


“We just weren’t being creative musically,” he says. “Being on the road 280 days a year, you wind up playing too much and it isn’t fun anymore. Soon, you stop being that concerned about how good you can be, how important it is to create and write. You kind of lose sight of that, of being focused on your craft and spending time with your instrument. I’ve become more in love with my guitar now, and staying relaxed and practicing and trying to create different sounds.”


The new album showcases the unique chemistry of the Family Band—comprised of the guitarist’s actual family members Marcus Randolph, Danyel Morgan, and Lenesha Randolph, together with guitarist Brett Haas. The eleven original compositions, plus a stomping cover of “Love Rollercoaster” by the Ohio Players, were produced by Robert Randolph & The Family Band, Danyel Morgan, Marcus Randolph, Tommy Sims, Drew Ramsey, and Shannon Sanders; engineered by the legendary Eddie Kramer (Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin); and feature special guest appearances from Trombone Shorty and Carlos Santana.


Randolph notes that the title track of Lickety Split (on which his sister sings the hook) is one of his favorites. “What’s great about that one is that it’s something we actually played in church, just like that,” he says. “There’s a section in the service called the ‘Jubilee Jam Session Time,’ and I can show you video where we played that very same riff.”


But if there’s one track on the album that captures the band’s new spirit, it’s one that started as a jam session in a Nashville studio during a break in recording, and later came to be titled “Born Again.” “It’s about finding the joy again,” says Randolph. “At first it was more of a love song, the sense you get when you find the right person, but then as we were recording this new music with a whole new sense of direction, and feeling free again, that all came into it. It’s not a religious thing, it’s just new energy—which is really the old energy that I had at the beginning of my career.”


Robert Randolph & The Family Band first gained national attention with the release of the album Live at the Wetlands in 2002. The band followed with three studio recordings over the next eight years—Unclassified, Colorblind, and We Walk This Road—which, together with tireless touring and unforgettable performances at such festivals as Bonnaroo, Austin City Limits, and the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, won them an expanding and passionate fan base. Randolph’s unprecedented prowess on his instrument garnered him a spot on Rolling Stone’s “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time” list, and also attracted the attention of such giants as Eric Clapton and Carlos Santana, who have collaborated with him on stage and in the studio.


“What I’ve learned from being around those guys—and you never really notice it until the moment is away from you—is that it’s really important to them that someone keeps original music going, that you’re not just trying to be like everybody else,” he says. “Eric really wants to know what’s going on now, he’s always going ‘Show me that lick again!’—they’re like little kids, and that’s really the great part about it. It makes me think that I need to keep getting better, to stay excited and keep trying to be innovative and keep growing.”


Most recently, Randolph has attempted to amplify the tradition from which he came by executive producing the Robert Randolph Presents the Slide Brothers album, a recording which features some of the older “sacred steel” players from the House of God church who inspired him to pick up an instrument. “This is part of my whole story, which a lot of people don’t understand,” he says. “In our church organization, playing lap steel in church has been going on since the 1920s. These guys were my mentors, my Muddy Waters and B.B. Kings. Thinking that I started this style is like saying Stevie Ray Vaughan was the first guy to play the blues. I wanted to do this record so that everybody could understand the story and start connecting the dots.”


He is also taking a bold new step by remodeling an abandoned school building in his hometown of Irvington, New Jersey and opening the Robert Randolph Music and Arts Program. “There hasn’t been any arts in the schools, period, since I was in high school,” he says. “So my whole motivation changed to a full-on effort to get these kids into music, and also find out what other passions they have and try to offer that. These kids don’t have anything to do, they don’t have any hope.”


With a new label, a new dedication to his craft, and a new sense of responsibility in his life off-stage, it seems like Lickety Split might also represent the urgency Robert Randolph is bringing to all of his efforts these days. “I’m still undiscovered, and that’s really the best thing about it,” he says. “Now we have the chance to present the music right, and have the story told right, and for me to be focused on being an ambassador for inner-city kids and a role model, and also an ambassador for my instrument and as an artist. As all these things happened, it got fun again.”
with special guests Con Brio
with special guests Con Brio
The night before Con Brio headed into the studio to record their first full-length album, 23-year-old Ziek McCarter had a dream. In it, the singer received a visit from his father, an Army veteran who died at the hands of East Texas police in 2011. His father delivered an invitation: Come with me to paradise.

McCarter woke up with a song in his bones. "It was one of the most spiritual moments of my life," he recalls. It was up to him, he knew, to rise above injustice, and to perform in a way that lifted up those around him as well. To make Con Brio's music a place of serenity, compassion -- even euphoria -- right here on earth.

Paradise, which saw the San Francisco band teaming with legendary producer Mario Caldato Jr. (Beastie Boys, Beck, Seu Jorge), is the result: a declaration of independence you can dance to; an assertion of what can happen when the human spirit is truly free.

Formed in 2013, Con Brio is the offspring of seven musicians with diverse backgrounds but a shared love for the vibrant Bay Area funk and psychedelic-soul sound pioneered by groups like Sly & the Family Stone.

By 2015, when the band self-produced their debut EP, Kiss the Sun, Con Brio had already become a West Coast institution on the strength of their magnetic live show, with McCarter's swiveling hips, splits and backflips earning him frequent comparisons to a young Michael Jackson or James Brown.

After a busy 2015 spent touring the U.S. and Europe, playing alongside veterans Galactic and Fishbone, and racking up critical acclaim on proving grounds like Austin City Limits -- where PopMatters declared Con Brio "the best new live band in America" -- they headed home to parlay their momentum, chemistry and tight live sound into a full-length record.

In an era when much has been made of the "death of the album," there's no question that Paradise, released internationally in summer 2016, is a fully-formed journey -- a trip made all the more immersive by Caldato's raw, live style of production. "We tried to create a narrative in the studio, in the same way that we segue between songs live," explains McCarter of the record's arc.

From the first primal wail of Benjamin Andrews' electric guitar on the title track -- Paradise is bookended by intro and outro versions -- the album tells a story about modern life through its contradictions: "Liftoff" speaks of an urge to fly, to transcend the day-to-day with a starry, bird's-eye view. "Hard Times" brings us crashing back to earth with the struggles of city life, inequality, and a fractured society desperate for healing. "Money" is a revolution, a rejection of societal pressure to equate success with a paycheck and abandon one's dreams in the process.

"Free & Brave," the band's most overtly political anthem, is also arguably its most infectious. Over a driving R&B groove courtesy of veteran rhythm section Jonathan Kirchner and Andrew Laubacher (bass and drums), McCarter name-checks Trayvon Martin and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Clearly inspired by his own personal relationship with police brutality, the song is equal parts heartbreaking and hopeful.

"'Free & Brave' is in part a response to the Black Lives Matter movement, but it was also created to serve as a reminder -- to myself and to whoever finds joy in that song -- that there is a light there. We don't have to get bogged down, we don't have to feel helpless," says McCarter. "We might not see it on a daily basis, but we are still 'the land of the free and home of the brave'...I still take pride in that, in what pieces of joy and happiness we can create here with our actions."

Of course, songs about love and passion remain Con Brio's native tongue. (At a recent Australian festival in which the band shared a bill with D'Angelo, one journalist told McCarter his sex appeal had eclipsed that of his longtime idol. McCarter continues to have no comment.) So it's a refreshing surprise that the strongest love song on Paradise, in fact, is "Honey," a sweet, spacious and vulnerable tune that allows the band's horn section, Brendan Liu and Marcus Stephens, to shine. Though the band's built a reputation on sonic bravado, it's choices like these -- moments in which the music's power flows from its subtlety -- that truly highlight where Con Brio is going.

As for where they're literally going: The second half of 2016 will see Con Brio embarking on an ambitious international touring schedule, including stops at the lion's share of major American music festivals (Bonnaroo, Lollapalooza, Summerfest and San Francisco's own Outside Lands); Fuji Rock, Japan's largest annual music event; Montreal Jazz Fest, the North Sea Jazz Festival in Rotterdam, the Netherlands; London; Paris; and more.

Which is not to say they're intimidated. After performing most of these songs live throughout the past year, the team is running on adrenaline, and they're thrilled to finally put this record in people's hands. To bring old fans along for the journey, to help new fans lose themselves in a beat or a message. To spread music that, hopefully, shakes away the daily grind -- and nurtures listeners' dreams about what their version of paradise on earth might look like, even for the duration of a song.

Ziek McCarter already knows what his looks like, because Con Brio's building it. And from where he's sitting, they're well past ready for liftoff.

"We don't want to walk, we don't want to drive," he says with a laugh. "We want to fly. We want to levitate."
Venue Information:
The Capitol Theatre
149 Westchester Avenue
Port Chester, NY, 10573
http://thecapitoltheatre.com/