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  • Deep Banana Blackout

    Deep Banana Blackout

    Moon Hooch

    Sat, February 20, 2016

    Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

    The Capitol Theatre

    Port Chester, NY

    $25 // $30 // $45 (ADVANCE) $30 // $35 // $50 (DAY OF SHOW)

    This event is 18 and over

    This event will have a general admission standing room only floor and a reserved seated Loge and Balcony.  Reserved Loge and Balcony tickets will NOT have access to the general admission floor.

    Deep Banana Blackout
    Deep Banana Blackout
    Deep Banana Blackout (or DBB) formed in the summer of 1995 when a group of like-minded musicians hailing from New York and Connecticut joined forces to play Soul and R&B covers from the 60’s and 70’s for the pure love of that music. As the band members’ chemistry became apparent, all other projects fell to the wayside so that they could focus on writing and arranging original material. The band soon became a highly acclaimed musical force on the East Coast underground live music scene. This eight piece musical outfit, with full horn section and soulful groove embedded in the roots of funk, is notorious for weaving their own compositions involving extended improvisation with songs by Sly and the Family Stone, James Brown, Stevie Wonder, and Parliament/Funkadelic.

    In July of 1997, DBB released their first studio effort entitled Live in the Thousand Islands. The album was recorded in Hartford, CT in the old Colt.45 building and was produced by the band members themselves. In February 1999, Deep Banana Blackout released their second recording, a double live CD called Rowdy Duty. The album was recorded in one night at 7 Willow St., a now defunct club in Port Chester, New York. Later on that year, the band’s label Artkin Touchya Records released B’Gock!, a side project for DBB’s guitarist Fuzz and his band On The Corner.

    Also in 1999 drummer Eric Kalb and percussionist Johnny Durkin went into Avatar Studios in NYC to record on jazz guitar legend John Scofield’s Verve Records release entitled Bump. The album was featured on the Billboard Jazz charts and pay homage to DBB through the track ‘Blackout’ which features a rhythmic refrain imitative of an audience chant typical at DBB’s live shows preceding the encore.Deep Banana Blackout has sold out such venues as Irving Plaza in New York City, the Webster Theater in Hartford, Connecticut and Toads Place in New Haven, CT multiple times. They were featured at the Newport Jazz Festival in the summer of 2000, as well as being the focal point of a feature article in JazzTimes. In 2001, DBB played a co-bill with Maceo Parker in the new Denver Fillmore to 2750 fans, was featured at events such as Jazz Aspen/Snowmass, and the Gathering of the Vibes and toured with the Allman Brothers Band with several DBB members joining the legendary group for their set. The band has also performed in Tokyo, Japan twice.

    DBB released 2001’s Feel the Peel on Flying Frog Records, the label founded by Allman Brothers drummer Butch Trucks.

    Over the course of the bands 20 year history many notable musicians from the Funk, Rock and Jazz world have joined DBB on stage. The list includes legendary musicians such as bassist George Porter Jr (The Meters), trombonist Fred Wesley (James Brown/P Funk), keyboardist Bernie Worrell (P Funk), drummer Clyde Stubblefield (James Brown), guitarist Warren Haynes (Allman Brothers Band/Govt. Mule), John Scofield (Miles Davis), trumpeter Michael Ray (Kool and The Gang/Sun Ra), drummer Mike Clark (Herbie Hancocks Headhunters) as well as drummer Chris Franz and bassist Tina Weymouth of Talking Heads/Tom Tom Club to name a few. A true highlight for the band was opening for James Brown at The Gathering of the Vibes Festival in 2003.

    Deep Banana Blackout continues to perform to a devoted following, selling out venues and shows no sign of stopping.

    DBB are James “Fuzz” San Giovanni, guitar/vocals; Eric Kalb, drums; Benj LeFevre, bass; Jen Durkin, vocals; Rob Somerville, sax/vocals; Rob Volo, trombone/guitar/vocals; Cyrus Madan, keyboards; Johnny Durkin, percussion. Previous members Hope Clayburn, sax/flute/ vocals, and Bryan Smith, trombone/vocals.
    Moon Hooch
    Moon Hooch
    Moon Hooch captured the imaginations of thousands with its infamous stints busking on subway platforms and elsewhere in New York City: two sax players and a drummer whipping up furious, impromptu raves. This happened with such regularity at the Bedford Ave station in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, that the band was banned from playing there by the NYPD. The trio's subsequent tours with They Might Be Giants, Lotus, and Galactic as well as on their own have only broadened the band's appeal. Wherever Moon Hooch plays, a dance party soon follows.

    Hornblow Recordings and Palmetto Records are now proud to release Moon Hooch's second album, This Is Cave Music, on Sept 16, 2014. The title refers to the term Moon Hooch coined to describe their unique sound: like house music, but more primitive and jagged and raw. Horn players Mike Wilbur and Wenzl McGowen do this by utilizing unique tonguing methods, or adding objects — cardboard or PVC tubes, traffic cones, whatever's handy — to the bells of their horns to alter their sound. Not to be outdone, drummer James Muschler gets swelling, shimmering sounds from his cymbals, and covers the head of his snare with a stack of splash cymbals to emulate the sound of a Roland TR-808 drum machine's clap.

    Wilbur was raised in Massachusetts, and Muschler in Ohio; McGowen grew up in several different European countries. The three met while students at The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music in New York City, and they found in each other a common work ethic and holistic philosophy. Moon Hooch are committed to environmental and agricultural sustainability, and they're such fans of Michael Pollan's groundbreaking The Omnivore's Dilemma that they visited the farm that Pollan profiled in the book, Polyface Farms, in rural Virginia while on tour in 2013. Moon Hooch literally caused a stampede when they set up and played their song "Tubes" in the pasture as cattle swirled in the background. (The trio lived to tell the tale, and the "Cattle Dance Party" video has been viewed nearly 200,000 times and counting on YouTube.) Muschler also maintains a blog called Cooking in the Cave (cookinginthecave.net) where he chronicles the band's vegan tour-van culinary endeavors — it's amazing what these guys can do with a hot plate.

    While their self-titled first album, which cracked the top 10 of Billboard's Jazz Albums chart, approximated the band's acoustic approach to dance music, This Is Cave Music takes their cave music hybrid further into electronic and pop music realms with synthesizers, post-production work, and even singing added to the mix. "We aren't trying to do it for the sake of reaching a wider audience," McGowen points out. "We are doing it because it's where our passion has evolved to. This album is a culmination of that."

    The source material was, like the first album, mostly recorded at The Bunker Studio in Brooklyn by Jacob Bergson, with McGowen on contrabass clarinet and baritone saxophone, Wilbur on tenor saxophone and vocals, and Muschler anchoring things on percussion. Everyone was involved in the digital additions. "We spent a lot of time on tour producing the set, running all the live sound through Ableton software, and manipulating the studio sound on our computer while in the car," Wilbur explains. "We could just pass the computer around and work on it for hours."

    The album opens with the old school "No. 6" where Wilbur wails on digitally modified tenor saxophone as McGowen anchors the low end with contrabass clarinet, providing those shifting acid house bass sounds. As always, Muschler provides tasty, precise beats and fills.

    Things turn to straight up new wave on "Mountain Song" with Wilbur's dreamy vocals alongside icy synthesizers and machine-like drumbeats with contrabass clarinet filling the backdrop. Celebrating the band's love of Depeche Mode, "Rainy Day" is a classic synth-pop love song where Wilbur actually recorded his vocals in the van after a gig in North Carolina while on tour with Mike Doughty.

    The circular sounding "St. Louis" is the final of three synth-pop road tunes written by the horn players. (The tour stop that gave the song its name was also memorable because Muschler cut his hand wide open while making dinner backstage. The drummer played that show in St. Louis and many that followed with one hand.) This is the band at its most anthemic with Wilbur on vocals and sax, McGowen on contrabass clarinet and a now-healed Muschler on drums.

    "5-Sax Piece" uses multiple sax overdubs from Wilbur to create a polytonal, synthesizer-like backdrop, while elsewhere, McGowen's Electronic Wind Instrument (EWI) synthesizer can be heard at various times, most notably on the track that bears its name.

    The album closes with a suite of songs that fit together so well that they are usually a closing sequence of the band's live set. Written by Muschler, the first chord of "Bari 3" features the lowest note of both the baritone and tenor saxophone and moves on from there to more traditional Moon Hooch fare. Sliding in behind it is the trance music-like "Why Not," which was written by Wilbur. The idea here was to write a two-note melody and see how far the band could take it, which is quite far into minimalist house music. "Contra Dubstep" follows with Wilbur singing, rapping even playing slide whistle.

    The finale is one of the band's most popular and infamous songs. A live YouTube video for "Milk and Waffles," finds the band playing in the middle of a freeway bridge; while no cars ever pass, Muschler was so overwhelmed by the moment that he closed the song by taking off his clothes, trashing his drum kit and walking away.

    Listening to this music, it's easy to become emotionally invested. It may not always prompt you to strip off your clothes, but the emotional impact on both the musicians and their fans is visceral and undeniable.
    Venue Information:
    The Capitol Theatre
    149 Westchester Avenue
    Port Chester, NY, 10573
    http://thecapitoltheatre.com/